Historical timeline

Aug. 6, 1828

Andrew Taylor Still, DO, is born in Lee County, Virginia.

Aug. 6, 1828

The Still family cabin sits in its original location in Virginia.

1837

The Still family moves to Missouri.

1838

At age 10, Dr. Still uses a rope sling to alleviate a headache, which is the first time he uses an osteopathic method.

1838

In his autobiography, Dr. Still noted the first time he used an osteopathic method.

1849

Dr. Still marries Mary Margaret Vaughn.

1850

Dr. Still moves to Kansas to help his father provide care for Native Americans.

1857

Dr. Still is elected to Kansas State Legislature.

1859

Mary Margaret dies, leaving Dr. Still with three young children.

1860

Dr. Still marries Mary Elvira Turner.

1860

Mary Elvira Turner became known as the mother of osteopathic medicine.

1861

Dr. Still enlists in the Union Army in the Civil War and is distraught by the medical care and effects of opium.

1861

Dr. Still’s enlistment record shows he served in the Union Army. He was as a hospital steward in the 9th Kansas Cavalry, a captain in the 18th Kansas Militia, and a major in the 21st Kansas Militia.

1864

Dr. Still had already lost his first wife and three young children. Illness hits his family, and four children die within four weeks. His frustration increases with the current state of medicine. Even as a physician, he felt helpless in trying to save those closest to him.

June 22, 1874

After years of study and research, Dr. Still begins to practice what would become osteopathic medicine. He announces his new theory by saying, “I flung to the breeze the banner of Osteopathy.”

1875

Dr. Still moves to Kirksville, Missouri (population 1,800). He works as a traveling physician in rural northern Missouri.

Late 1880s

Dr. Still’s fame grows, and he coins the term “osteopathy.”

Late 1880s

Dr. Still is shown holding a femur and pelvis.

1892

ATSU opens as the American School of Osteopathy (ASO) in Kirksville. Osteopathic medical education is born.

1892

ASO’s first class included three of Dr. Still’s children and one nephew.

1892

A.T. Still, DO becomes the first president of the American School of Osteopathy

1892

1894

The Journal of Osteopathy is launched in Kirksville.

1894

The Journal of Osteopathy featured Dr. Still on the cover of the first issue. The journal was printed from 1894-1964. To view the early issues online, visit atsu.edu/museum/subscription.

1897

Missouri legalizes osteopathic medicine as a profession.

1897

Dr. Still publishes his autobiography.

June 22, 1897

Dr. Still receives his diploma from ASO, officially earning his DO degree.

1908

ASO establishes a nursing program.

1908

Dr. Still demonstrates osteopathic manipulation on Augusta Teuckes, an ASO student nurse.

1917

The first statue of Dr. Still is unveiled on campus. Today, this statue is located on the Adair County Courthouse grounds.

1917

Dr. Still’s statue stands in its original location in front of the ASO hospital.

Dec. 12, 1917

Dr. Still dies at age 89 in Kirksville.

1918

George Still, MD, DO becomes the president of the American School of Osteopathy

1918

1922

A second osteopathic school, the Andrew Taylor Still College of Osteopathy and Surgery (ATSCOS), is founded by George M. Laughlin, DO, 1900, Dr. Still’s son-in-law. ASO continues under the administration of S.S. Still, DO, Dr. Still’s nephew.

1922

Summerfield S. Still, LLM, DO becomes the university president of the American School of Osteopathy

1922

1922

George M. Laughlin, DO becomes the president of the A.T. Still College of Osteopathy and Surgery

1922

1924

ASO and ATSCOS merge to become the Kirksville Osteopathic College.

1925

Kirksville Osteopathic College becomes a nonprofit educational institution.

1926

The School is renamed the Kirksville College of Osteopathy and Surgery (KCOS).

1928

The American Osteopathic Association is held in Kirksville for the last time.

1928

During the 1928 AOA parade, men dressed up as Abraham Lincoln, Dr. Still, and George Washington on a float.

1938

President George M. Laughlin, DO, 1900, earmarks $5,000 from the College’s general fund for research.

1938

President Laughlin and Dr. Denslow examine medical instruments.

1944

Morris R Thompson, DSc (Hon.) becomes the president of the A.T. Still College of Osteopathy and Surgery

1944

1949

KCOS Rural Clinics program is established.

1951

U.S. Congress amended the Social Security Act so the term “physician” includes osteopathic physician.

1953

The tenets of osteopathic medicine are published.

1960

The Rockefellers donate $1 million to construct the Timken-Burnett Research Building.

1960

The Timken-Burnett Research Building was completed in 1963.

1967

DO graduates were allowed to participate in the military residency match for the first time in 1967, which allowed DOs to participate side-by-side with MDs in graduate training and for DOs to be drafted.

1971

The School is renamed the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine (KCOM).

1973

H. Charles Moore, PhD becomes the president of the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine

1973

1973

The doctor of osteopathy (DO) degree is officially licensed in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

1978

The first Osteopathic Week is celebrated statewide in Missouri.

1982

The Thompson Campus Center is dedicated.

1982

The TCC holds an outdoor event in 1987.

1983

Max T. Gutensohn, DO becomes the interim president of the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine

1983

1984

Fred C. Tinning, PhD becomes the president of the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine

1984

1984

Primary Care Clinic is renamed the Gutensohn Osteopathic Health and Wellness Clinic.

1992

KCOM celebrates its centennial anniversary.

1995

KCOM opens the Arizona School of Health Sciences in Mesa, Arizona.

1996

Phyllis J. Blondefield, PhD becomes the interim president of the Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine

1996

1997

James J. McGovern, PhD becomes the president of A.T. Still University

1997

1999

The College of Graduate Health Studies is added in Kirksville, initially named School of Health Management.

2001

The name A.T. Still University (ATSU) is adopted as the umbrella for all schools.

2001

ATSU-ASHS moves to its current campus in Mesa, Arizona. image: Arizona campus

2001

2003

ATSU’s Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health opens in Mesa.

2003

ATSU-ASDOH became the first dental school in the state of Arizona.

2006

ATSU’s School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona opens in Mesa.

2006

ATSU-SOMA’s unique model focuses on partnerships with community health centers and placing students in clinical settings in their second year of study.

2008

W. Jack Magruder, EdD becomes the president of A.T. Still University

2008

2010

The Atlas Fraternity House is lost to fire. Built in 1912, this was originally the home of Dr. Still’s son, Charles E. Still, DO, 1894.

2010

2012

Jack Magruder, EdD, retired as president of ATSU on June 30, and Craig M. Phelps, DO, ’84, became ATSU president, effective July 1.

2013

Dr. Still is inducted into the Hall of Famous Missourians.

2013

A bronze bust of Dr. Still was unveiled and placed on the third floor rotunda of the Missouri Capitol.

2013

ATSU’s Missouri School of Dentistry & Oral Health opens in Kirksville.

2013

2014

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, American Osteopathic Association, and American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine announced a single graduate medical education accreditation system.

2017

ATSU celebrates its 125th anniversary!

2017